Stephen Hopkins

Mayflower Adventurer Stephen Hopkins

Only about a third of the Mayflower passengers were part of the religious refugees who fled England to live in the more tolerant Holland before sailing on the famous ship. Stephen Hopkins and his second wife, Elizabeth were among those who sailed for other reasons. His biography is amazing. He was born in 1581 in Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England. By 1604 he was living in Hursley, Hampshire and married to Mary. Their first child was daughter […]

Continue reading
John Carver Mayflower Governor

Mayflower Governor John Carver

Before they sailed in 1620, English religious refugee passengers  appointed one of the deacons from the congregation they were leaving behind in Holland as their governor for the voyage. Mayflower Governor John Carver earned that role through his many efforts to make the trip possible. They couldn’t just call a travel agent to book passage. The trip required years of planning and numerous trips back and forth across the English Channel to make arrangements. A […]

Continue reading
Plimoth Plantation

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a name? Does it really matter all that much what name or label we use to identify groups of people? The bard William Shakespeare famously had Juliet in Romeo and Juliet, say, “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” If by that he meant the name of the flower isn’t what matters; but rather the fragrance of it, well then, sure what difference does it make? But what if the alternate […]

Continue reading
Peace treaty

Pilgrim and Native Peace Talks

The passengers on the Mayflower knew the New World was populated with people; people they referred to as savages primarily because they dressed and worshiped differently than folks back in England. Some of these Natives belonged to the Wampanoag Nation of communities, numbering an estimated 30,000 in the early 1600’s. At the time the English Pilgrim and Adventurer settlers began exploring Cape Cod the Wampanoags were ruled by Sachem Massasoit (also known as Ousamequin) who lived […]

Continue reading
First Thanksgiving

The “First” Thanksgiving Was No Picnic

The traditional Thanksgiving story about the Pilgrims and the Native Americans coming together for three days of feasting is as much fiction as fact. For starters, there are credible claims of other thanksgiving celebrations among European immigrants that predate the 1621 version taught in many schools. The Natives had their own rituals around marking the harvest season. The New England Natives and the Europeans did come together approximately a year after the English arrived on […]

Continue reading